A Brief Examination of “Crazy”

If you haven’t heard a person describe someone in their life as crazy, then I could reasonably assume that you’ve only recently taken up habitation on planet Earth. There must be some coding in our DNA which urges us to make this assessment at some stage in our processing of conflict. [citation needed] .

I’m not going to dive into every implication here, including how it’s representative of ableism. But this is where my mind goes when I hear someone describe another as crazy (usually dudes talking about women they’ve associated with): I assume they haven’t done the work of understanding the person they label as such. “Crazy” can easily indicate the mindset of the describing party, a word with which it rhymes: lazy.

I know someone close to me who I’ve probably described in the past in this way. But crazy doesn’t really tell anyone anything. It’s a featureless void down a poisoned well.

If you had to distance yourself, make boundaries, or otherwise protect yourself from someone, it is worth understanding and expressing exactly why, to the best of your ability, for your own sake and others’.

The person in my example is not crazy. But they are emotionally abusive, blindly and rabidly defensive, petty, and manipulative. They have proven they cannot take criticism, but instead will deflect blame back on the offended party. They’ve exchanged their own autonomy and critical thinking for a blind loyalty to a system. They have bullied those around them into silent acquiescence. They cover for their own ignorance on many key points by employing loud ad hominem attacks. And there will be peace with them only as long as you conform to their whims to their satisfaction.

But they are not crazy.

Precision in our language is about more than “political correctness” or some other convention. Precise language gives proper weight to its subject. Precise language is “STOP: Bridge Closed” instead of “Caution: Reduce Speed”. Accurate character or behavior assessments not only provide the necessary cautions, but are also the only basis for any real change in thinking or behavior. And if you can’t delve any deeper into someone’s character than to dismiss them as crazy, maybe… it’s not them who is the problem. Maybe you missed sign after sign, hint after hint, invitation after invitation to go deeper and truly understand them, and they lost all patience, trust, or hope in your ability or desire to see them. Just maybe.

We are often unable on our own to untangle the mess others have put us in. Therapy, counseling, time and distance, and the wisdom of friends are all needed sometimes. We owe it to everyone involved to try to do better than “they are crazy”. We’d be crazy not to.

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A Few Half-Baked Reactions from my Microbiology Explorations

So I’ve found it hard to read anything long-form over the past few years. Perhaps due to depression, burn-out, social media rewiring our brains, all of the above. I’m not sure. Take your pick. But fairly recently, I noticed I tended to wind my brain down at night by digging into histories and scientific analysis of natural history, geology, and biology – anything from tectonic plates to octopus brains. This isn’t exactly a new fascination for me, but it had been kind of muted for awhile.

One reason I hadn’t given much investment into this interest was because of the nature of the evolution vs creation battle, and the side I had been on since I could say the word “frog” without pronouncing it “fwog”. It was fascinating to learn about these things, but there was always this wall that would come up – a sort of angered, mocking sense of superiority and defensiveness whenever some variation of the phrase “millions of years” would appear in the given scientific treatise or media.

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Psychological Trauma and Compassion

I’ve struggled with my own PTSD, and most of my friends and family (the ones I’m close to and have named their struggle, at least) have as well. I’m assuming everyone who might read this (if I know my audience at all) gives weight to the effects of psychological trauma on the mind.

I might be out of my depth a bit talking about this, but I don’t intend for this to be a scientific/medical treatise as much as it is a friendly one. And it probably won’t be news to anyone anyway, but sometimes we need to hear things said again. I know I do. I’ve noticed a disconnect at times in my own mind regarding what I should reasonably expect out of myself in response to past trauma, and maybe talking it out here will help someone else.

Also, while I know this is more general information anyone might benefit from, I want to aim at men here. Partly because I am one, and also because for a number of reasons I don’t believe we always give proper weight to what I’m about to dive into.

Physical injuries require a healing process. Often, the more severe the injury, the longer and more intensive the healing process must be.

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Capturing Freedom

When my wife suggested I put her largely unused DSLR camera to use on something she correctly identified as a passion of mine, it just made sense. I have been taking pictures of critters and plants and weird things for about as long as cell phone cameras have been a thing. But I had never invested a penny into it. So I went hunting for a decent entry-level lens (her old lens wasn’t the right specs for my particular area of interest), and started making time for it. Two years later, I’m still going at it, and it has been very rewarding. But just how rewarding is why I’m writing this.

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Negative Space

That great tome of knowledge, Wikipedia, defines negative space thusly:

“Negative space, in art, is the space around and between the subject(s) of an image. Negative space may be most evident when the space around a subject, not the subject itself, forms an interesting or artistically relevant shape, and such space occasionally is used to artistic effect as the “real” subject of an image.

Example (from the Wikipedia article):

The image on the right is of the vase, but the mind also sees two faces squaring off in the black.

Another example humorously depicts how negative space can be used in text:

(Source)

My wife is very knowledgeable about art, and I’m pretty sure I first heard this term from her years ago. This sort of thing is just not my area of expertise, and it was new to me, but this concept lodged in my mind recently. I wonder how much our minds are defined by negative space. Often, even though we’ve changed our minds on this or that, our positions can still be defined by our old belief system – the negative space, as it were.

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“Thou Art The Man”

David, Mr Man-After-God’s-Own-Heart and anointed one, knew the answer to the story the prophet was telling him. Throw the book at him, he says. We used to have an idiom down here which goes “hanging is too good for ‘im” – David was all about that. What kind of sorry sumbitch steals from a poor man? The literal worst, that’s who!

But the story told by Nathan as it is recorded was intentionally vague, abstract – no names or places. There was only one right answer – only a monster wouldn’t condemn this, right? David seems eager to flex his virtuous muscles, and probably his executive muscles – one might accuse him of virtue-signaling, but when you wield supreme executive power you get to off anyone you think deserves it, and he’d already demonstrated a lack of inhibition there.

If you’re reading this, you probably know that whole story so I don’t need to say much more in prologue. The reason it’s on my mind today is because….

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Deconstruction, or The Process of Changing Your Mind

I’ve got this subject on my mind today, and I’d like to share a little of my own process as I think. None of this is new or something you can’t get anywhere else in essence, but maybe a point or two will connect to someone uniquely.

In the past 4-5 years, I’ve changed my mind on a few topics. I want to use 2 examples mainly, because they have been hot topics in the Christian world for awhile now, and I believe them to be vitally important in their own right. I’ll get to them specifically further down, but I’d like to go over a few general points before I get there, starting with 3 key catalysts for change.

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A Reflection on Les Misérable

I and a few family members had the opportunity to see Les Misérable a few nights ago. I love that play. It’s a punch to the gut. I’m not much into musicals generally, but this one is the exception.

As Jean Valjean is near death in the end of the play, one thing stuck out to me. The ones who appear to comfort him in his last moments and welcome him into Paradise, as it were, are not angels, or some appearance of God, or even saints of old.

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Is Hogwarts an Argument for Gun Ownership?

I recall seeing an interesting argument from some conservative folks about the Harry Potter series and gun ownership over the past year or so. Or rather, it was an accusation of hypocrisy on the part of liberals who love both the Harry Potter series and advocate for strict gun control or even a total ban. The contradiction essentially boiled down to the fact that almost every magically-inclined man and woman in the world carries a wand: a powerful instrument which could seriously injure or kill, in either self defense or attack. Therefore, so the line of reasoning goes, advocates for more strict gun laws and especially bans who also happened to be fans of the series are hypocrites, for loving a vision of a fantasy world apparently incompatible with the vision they hold for their own. I remember seeing this come up a few times, and I don’t recall seeing a counter-argument, nor did one occur to me at the time, so I wanted to take a brief look at it here.

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